Welcome! I’m Andrew Joyce (aka Banjo) and I’m the creator of the Banjo Blog. I’m a professional banjo player and I travel the world playing festivals and weddings. I use my blog to share my passion for the banjo and for the music I love. If you’re reading this, chances are you want to travel like Banjo. Booking a holiday tour has never been easier! I’ve created a site that will help you and your band get where you want to go. With my help, you’ll have no problem getting a job, playing a gig, or making friends.

Welcome to my blog

This site is all about you! I’d love to help you get there. Travel Planning If you’re planning a trip somewhere, let me know! I’m always on the lookout for new destinations, and will help you plan your trip around things that are interesting to me. It’s easy to get stuck on a map and not see what’s going on around you. Travel planning will take you to the places I’ve been and the people I’ve met, and you’ll come away with some valuable insights. Special Announcements This site has a special offer – 10% off your booking with code “TREATME10” when you create a new booking. This is a great way to get more people into your tour.

Tips for traveling by plane

You’ve booked your flight, you have your passport and ticket, you have your luggage… now all you need to do is hop on board and start your adventure. I recommend traveling in coach if possible. If you can, try and bring your own seat. You will get more out of your flight experience if you are getting up and moving around. Not only will it make your flight go faster, but it will make your trip more comfortable. I’ve never heard of anyone being injured because they were stuck in their seat. Flying coach is also a great way to save money! Flying coach costs around $300 for my domestic flight from the UK to New York. Even with the money you save, you’re still paying around $100 or $120 per ticket, so you will be spending at least $250, which isn’t too bad.

On tour with a banjo

So, this post is about booking. A lot of people have asked me how to plan a trip or where to start planning, so I’m making this page to tell you exactly what to do. I’ve looked at a lot of online guidebooks to find out what works for travellers like me. You’ll see a lot of the same stuff, but I’ve organized this into a helpful, interactive way. How To Travel For Banjo Events Here are some tips and tricks you might need. They won’t save you money on the trip, but they’ll save you time. These are the things I found to be the most useful, and they’ll help you start planning. Not Your Average Guide Book Let’s start with the definition of an “online guidebook.” This is something like an interactive map, but in digital form.

Flying with your banjo

OK, so I’ve made an entire site dedicated to my banjo and my travels, and I’m the only banjo player in the Internet. It’s also the only site you’ll find that tells you how to book a flight with your banjo. I have to warn you though – it’s not cheap! Banjo Travel for the Ultimate Banjo Tour For more than a decade I’ve been picking up banjo gigs around the world and trying to book flights to places where they’re the cheapest. The advice below is meant to help you book a flight, find a job, and meet other banjo players. Let’s get started. As an experienced traveller, and someone who’s logged in more than 25,000 flights, I can tell you that it takes a few minutes to get everything together, but it can take up to a month to find a good deal.

Tricks for playing gigs on the road

Stay connected Maintaining a career takes a lot of time. But it’s not impossible. What you want to do is make the most of the time you do have to travel. A lot of people in traditional jobs don’t know what to do with their time. That’s why most people travel for one reason or another; they see the world and get out of the office. You’ll need to balance your music with your job. You need to do something you enjoy. I recommend picking up a second job on the side that doesn’t involve travel. Do you have a skill that can be useful in a new country? Then do something with it. You can always come back to it later. The world is so huge and so many things are on offer for people who are willing to travel. You can work at a store or bar, or you could build your own online business.

How to play banjo events if you’re shy

Everyone who’s traveling is starting to notice a new trend. Banjo events are popping up in an amazing way. They’re all over the world and it’s never been easier to travel and play. You can travel independently or hire a tour guide to show you around. These events can be a ton of fun and also create a great source of income. Here’s what you need to know to rock your banjo events. What’s the right age for Banjo Events? Banjo events can be good for you and your Banjo career. You get a chance to meet a lot of players and get a lot of exposure. If you’re young, you’ll have a lot of good opportunities coming your way. But, if you’re older, you can get a lifetime banjo career out of them. Being a young banjo player is a lot of fun, but eventually it won’t be a viable career option.

Tools for touring, from booking flights to packing your bags

And the most important part of traveling the world, I’m going to show you how to pick the best way to get around. You’ve got to love it and be able to share it with others! What’s in the Bag? Here’s a look at what I’m taking with me on the road: Guitars I took my pick of guitars on tour, including my custom-made Greensleeves Pickalong that I write songs on (see videos below) and my Silvertone Black Beauty Gibson and my Gibson J-160E Bigsby. Banjo Here’s a photo of my custom made Banjo. I take my black Gibson Starbuck banjo (shown above with the dark green saddle) when I play the banjo festival circuit. It has an F-1 action. I was originally going to go with a D-7A (measuring 16 inches) which measures 16.25 inches.

Conclusion

This is a large topic but I’ve attempted to make it as easy as possible. Thanks for reading and please give this site a like if you enjoyed it! If you want to book your banjo job, don’t forget to click the book my banjo job button!